Wonder Mountain Wilderness in Washington

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Wonder Mountain Wilderness

The tiny 2,349-acre Wonder Mountain Wilderness sits in the southeast corner of the Olympic National Forest, providing primitive wilderness experiences that demand plenty of strength and endurance. Read More

  • Scramble up to the top of Wonder Mountain, tough for even experienced climbers 
  • Fish at the wilderness’s remote lakes 
  • Experienced true wilderness hiking without the help of trails

What can I see and do at Wonder Mountain Wilderness? 

  • Hiking: There are no trails inside Wonder Mountain Wilderness. Therefore, anyone who wants to hike there should be prepared for a rugged experience that demands making your way over steep slopes and along ridges without benefit of any sort of pathway. Hikers should be experienced and prepared for a very difficult trek, but if you’re up to it, there’s no better place to find solitude. 
  • Mountain Climbing: Because there are no trails within this wilderness, reaching 4,758-foot Wonder Mountain can be quite a chore. Once you get there, it’s a Class 3 scramble to the top, traversing steep timber, plenty of rocks, and sometimes snow. June, July, and August are the best months for climbing Wonder Mountain. 
  • Fishing: If you can get to them, the remote lakes within this wilderness – most of which have no name – offer excellent trout fishing during the summer, with catches often measuring well over a foot long. 
  • Hunting: Hunting is permitted in Wonder Mountain Wilderness, but as with hiking or climbing, elk and deer hunting here demands experience in wilderness travel and mountaineering.

Where is Wonder Mountain Wilderness?

Wonder Mountain Wilderness is located just west of Lake Cushman in Mason County. The nearest town is Lilliwaup. To get there from Port Angeles, travel east on Highway 101 for about 80 miles to the Lilliwaup area. Look for signs for the wilderness.

How much does Wonder Mountain Wilderness cost?

Exploring the wilderness is free.

Who can I call if I have more questions?

For more information, call the Hood Canal Ranger District at 360-765-2200.

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